Products

HEPA Diffuser for Secondary Filtration Into Occupied Spaces.

Advantages:

Ability to exhaust into occupied areas or where exterior exhaust is not an option
Reduction of labor setting up.

Gentle diffusion of air into occupied areas; removes “blast” of air from negative air machines going direct into occupied areas.

Optional fire damper attachment for penetrating rated walls.

Engineering redundancy of secondary HEPA filtration for infection control purposes in a hospital setting. HEPA diffuser filter rated at 2,256 CFM 99.99% @ 0.30 micron

Easy to move. Stackable. Works with a standard Negative Air filtration unit.

Multi-use in commercial, medical and residential applications for hazardous materials removal, demolition, infection control or general dust control.

Test port for pressure testing filter

Smooth faced panel allows for semi-permanent installation on long term projects.

Simple rugged design easy to install in tight spaces in corridors eliminating the need for excessive exhaust ducting. 

DOP tested filter 99.99 % @ 0.30 Micron
MIL-STD 282 and MIL-STD 105E and the latest version of IEST-RP-CC034.1

In a work environment as found at construction sites, hospital clean rooms, manufacturing facilities, and the like, there is a need for removing, dust, bacteria, mold, hazardous asbestos, and other particulates from the ambient air. Typically, a work area is sealed off from the outside environment and an air filter assembly is placed within, with the exhaust air being ducted to outside the area require that work in sensitive areas, such as repair or construction work in hospitals, pharmacies, institutions such as prisons, and the like be monitored and controlled. Particulates, such as asbestos or other contaminants, that can be potentially disturbed during construction or renovation require control barriers to prevent the spread of contamination via air currents. These controls include maintaining a negative pressure environment throughout the work area for the duration of the work, and using an “exhaust to outside” rule where filtered air must be ducted to outside the building during construction and repairs. Ducting the filtered air outside the work area requires filtered air to be ducted a significant distance away from the work area to exit the building. Extensive ducting of filtered air is expensive, time-consuming, and often impractical. Ducting is also unrealistic for interior rooms of a large facility, causing increased labor costs and inconvenience for personnel in nearby spaces. Ducting air to outside the building can also dislodge debris above a ceiling space during installation and can contaminate additional areas. Therefore, there is a need to provide HEPA filtering of a closed room without the need to duct the filtered air out of the building.

Suitable for projects requiring the implementation of negative pressure systems as per:

CDC Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities (2003) Internal Demolition, Construction, Renovations, and Repairs Infection-control measure Steps for implementation of Negative-pressure room engineering features include negative pressure (greater exhaust than supply air volume); pressure differential of 2.5 Pa (0.01-in. water gauge) ; air flow volume differential >125-cfm exhaust versus supply; sealed room, approximately 0.5-sq. ft. leakage; clean to dirty air flow; monitoring; ≥ 12 air changes per hour (ACH) new or renovation, 6 ACH existing; and exhaust to outside or HEPA-filtered if recirculated.

OSHA Worker protection regulations Pressure Differential enclosures for ASBESTOS abatement:

The design parameters for static pressure differentials between the inside and outside of enclosures typically range from 0.02 to 0.10 inches of water gauge, depending on conditions. All zones inside the enclosure must have less pressure than the ambient pressure outside of the enclosure (-0.02 inches water gauge differential). Design specifications for the differential vary according to the size, configuration, and shape of the enclosure as well as ambient and mechanical air pressure conditions around the enclosure.

Air Flow Volume: The air flow volume (cubic meters per minute) exhausted (removed) from the workplace must exceed the amount of makeup air supplied to the enclosure. The rate of air exhausted from the enclosure should be designed to maintain a negative pressure in the enclosure and air movement past each worker. The volume of air flow removed from the enclosure should replace the volume of the container at every 5 to 15 minutes

Department of Industrial Relations allows for creative alternatives which can be shown to reliably achieve the objectives of negative-pressure enclosures. Requirements, cover general provisions to be followed in all asbestos jobs, provisions which must be followed for all Class I asbestos jobs, and provisions governing the construction and testing of negative pressure enclosures.

Suitable for projects requiring the implementation of negative pressure systems as per: CDC Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities (2003)Internal Demolition, Construction, Renovations, and Repairs Infection-control measure Steps for implementation of Negative-pressure room engineering features include negative pressure (greater exhaust than supply air volume); pressure differential of 2.5 Pa (0.01-in. water gauge) ; air flow volume differential >125-cfm exhaust versus supply; sealed room, approximately 0.5-sq. ft. leakage; clean to dirty air flow; monitoring; ≥12 air changes per hour (ACH) new or renovation, 6 ACH existing; and exhaust to outside or HEPA-filtered if recirculated. OSHA Worker protection regulations Pressure Differential enclosures for ASBESTOS abatement: The design parameters for static pressure differentials between the inside and outside of enclosures typically range from 0.02 to 0.10 inches of water gauge, depending on conditions. All zones inside the enclosure must have less pressure than the ambient pressure outside of the enclosure (-0.02 inches water gauge differential). Design specifications for the differential vary according to the size, configuration, and shape of the enclosure as well as ambient and mechanical air pressure conditions around the enclosure. Air Flow Volume: The air flow volume (cubic meters per minute) exhausted (removed) from the workplace must exceed the amount of makeup air supplied to the enclosure. The rate of air exhausted from the enclosure should be designed to maintain a negative pressure in the enclosure and air movement past each worker. The volume of air

flow removed from the enclosure should replace the volume of the container at every 5 to 15 minutes Department of Industrial Relations allows for creative alternatives which can be shown to reliably achieve the objectives of negative-pressure enclosures. Requirements, cover general provisions to be followed in all asbestos jobs, provisions which must be followed for all Class I asbestos jobs, and provisions governing the construction and testing of negative pressure enclosures.